THE SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS

DRAGO GLAMUZINA

V.B.Z., 2021, 162 pages

It was long before the pandemic hit that Drago Glamuzina began working on this decameronian novel. Another virus is at work here: the virus of a narration, at the same time disciplined and passionate. Almost all characters in the book are writers, professional story tamers, yet their stories and their consequences are at times difficult to contain. That doesn’t affect Glamuzina: the rhythm of the novel is steady, the tempo swift, while the dynamics toys skilfully with failed expectations. Don’t let the milieu choice discourages you: unlike the crowd you usually meet at the poet soirees, Glamuzina’s characters are unpretentious, complex and intriguing.

Marko Pogačar

Interestingly crafted, with dramatic twists, pyschological nuance and perceptive towards deviate behaviour (various individual experiences by characters whose lives are ruled by voujerism), The Second Law of Thermodynamics is one of the most intriguing and best novels published lately.nterestingly crafted, with dramatic twists, pyschological nuance and perceptive towards deviate behaviour (various individual experiences by characters whose lives are ruled by voujerism), The Second Law of Thermodynamics is one of the most intriguing and best novels published lately.

Strahimir Primorac | Vijenac

Translation rights sold: Bosnia & Herzegovina (Buybook), North Macedonia (Goten Publishing)

The Second Law of Thermodynamics follows a group of writers and their friends, gathered at a dinner party in honor of the special guest, the celebrated American author Jonathan Franzen. In the course of the tumultuous evening, each of them has to share an intimate story, something personal and traumatic never told anyone. The initial narrative cadre is a drunken party, that at the same time works as a therapy session and a confessional, during which we’re presented with a number of inconceivable yet realistic personal admissions. The Second Law of Thermodynamics corresponds with Murphy’s law: anything that can go wrong will go wrong. But this time, it’s not the laws of physics or society that went awry, it’s human lives.

Glamuzina is a master of the scene and dialogue; the narrative style is in many ways close to drama. Not only because the plot unravels in a single space, or because the narrative is structured mostly through dialogues and monologues, but because of every character’s internal conflict. The author dissects the lives of his protagonists sharply and to the bone. In a single sway and a highly plausible manner, from comical to incredible, from tragic to transcendental, we gain insight into the fundamental secrets of mankind.

 

 

In his new novel, Glamuzina searches for an answer to Carver’s eternal question: what do we talk about when we talk about love? In that search, he exposes various, at times incredible manifestations and implications of, in the words of Susan Sonntag, ‘the most mysterious of human relations’. In The Second Law of Thermodynamics, he brings to the stage fourteen men and women, congregates them on a party and makes them tell us their deepest secrets. All in their forties, all wrecked and worn out, all well aware that life is slipping away like sand through their fingers, and despite everything, all still immersed in their passions, obsessions and shadows. Last but not least, the importance of The Second Law of Thermodynamics lies in its inventive and complex structure, one for which takes a great literary talent.

Roman Simić